Sunday, December 15, 2013

I Think I Like Him

I don't really know much about this situation or how accurate this article is or anything substantive about, really, any of it.

"Francis has called Benedict's 2007 decree allowing wider use of the Latin Mass "prudent," but has warned that it risks being exploited on ideological grounds by factions in the church; Francis has made clear his disdain for traditionalist Catholics, saying they are self-absorbed retrogrades who aren't helping the church's mission to evangelize."

But here's what I do know: this is SPOT ON.

There's a tiny minority of traditionalists who see themselves as only one part of a whole, and whose aim is grow in charity with their fellow Catholics. The rest are simply trying in whatever way available to them to bend others to their will. When people don't comply, they cry persecution. I used to be this way.

I have nothing against the older liturgy, and clearly neither does Pope Francis, but I'm not sorry to see a crackdown on the rabble-raising and pseudo-intellectual whining.

10 comments:

  1. This passage is reprinted in this month's New Oxford Review. It is I think an interesting and correct summation of the new pope:

    “I’m afraid that Pope Francis has failed to consider carefully enough the likely consequences of letting loose with his thoughts in a world that will applaud being provided with such help in subverting the truth it is his job to guard as inviolable and proclaim with fidelity. For a long time he has been thinking these things. Now he can say them to the whole world — and he is self-indulgent enough to take advantage of the opportunity with as little care as he might unburden himself with friends after a good dinner and plenty of wine.” — moral theologian Germain Grisez, Inside the Vatican

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    1. You've got it bass-ackwards. It's traditionalists who have failed to consider the consequences of their actions, and they who need guidance, not Pope Francis. Also, the New Oxford Review is a non- credible rag written by cranks for cranks.

      CD from her phone

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    2. I realized after I posted that that I should have added some clarification as I didn't post that just in reference to traditionalists, but more about Pope Francis. I do think he likes to talk. I guess I just prefer people who measure their words like myself.

      NOR may be a rag, but I find Inside the Vatican to be more or less reputable.

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    3. Yes, I got that. I wonder why you're making the assumption that he's not measuring his words? Does that just mean "says what trads think should be said?" Who died and made them pope?

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  2. Hey Charming. I wholeheartedly agree with what you say. In fact, as of late, I've really not been happy with things going on in the Church, and unfortunately, a good portion of that has been at the hands of the "Trad Behaving Badly" traditionalists. They've ruined a lot of the good that was coming out of the Latin Mass post Summorum Pontificum, and I can't even go to a Latin Mass in my archdiocese without what they do plaguing my spiritual experience at TLMs. Despite a much badly needed improvement in catechesis in the "Novus Ordo" Masses and Church as it were, I'm finding a lot more love and mercy there as of late. Even on Servimus Unum Deum, I haven't written anything as of Nov 18. Maybe it's just best to hang low until the next papacy and maybe things will be different.

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    1. "Despite a much badly needed improvement in catechesis in the "Novus Ordo" Masses and Church as it were, I'm finding a lot more love and mercy there as of late."

      This is my experience as well. Are there a lot of people in our generation who weren't taught the things they should have been? Yes. But everything I've heard at the NO Masses in the year+ I've been attending has been spiritually helpful and charitable. Last week the priest said every year he asks for the congregation to pray for a special cause to Our Lady of Guadalupe, and this year it was for victims of domestic violence. I never heard anything like that at a Latin Mass--ever. They prayed to end abortion which is certainly an important issue but when they weren't doing that they just complained about the "New Church" and women's clothes. Granted, I don't think I saw any of that when I was in the UK, but by then I was so jaded by trads it didn't matter.

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  3. This is interesting. I will reiterate what you said, CD. It seems that the Pope is fulfilling his role as our shepherd and clearly liturgical disputes are not at the top of his priority list. I like them apples!

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  4. I also thought it was interesting that part of the problem was the "cult of personality" that seemed to be springing up. Some Facebook friends of mind took this article and ran with it, comparing it to how much worse he was treating a traditional organization than the Father Maciel scandal. I don't know much about all that, but I can't help wondering if this is an effort to prevent something similar.

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  5. I am not a Roman Catholic yet but have been spending the last couple of years trying to get some experience of the various subcultures (I know how irritating know-it-all converts can be!) and as an outsider, I think your observations have a ring of truth. One of the things I find fascinating is the vanity of certain (mostly American) traditionalists who don't seem to realise that, even if they are perfect, there are other traditionalists around the world who certainly aren't. My family are Nigerian and as someone who's also LGBTQ, I can assure you that none of the Catholics care what the catechism say about how to treat homosexuals - in his statements on that issue, Pope Francis probably wasn't telling off American Catholics who have been thoroughly chastised by losing their particular culture war, but those in places like Nigeria and Uganda whose commendable enthusiasm for morality has led to them simultaneously turning a blind eye to corruption and yet insisting that homosexuals should be executed, or at least imprisoned.

    I also find a similar blindness common to traditionalists of every tradition (certainly in Anglicanism) where it never seems to occur to them that the travesties of liberalism might actually have their roots in the failures of traditionalism. It's funny how on one blog, someone was wondering why the Pope was berating those who had done their best to uphold the church through the hard times before, during and after the Second Vatican and I couldn't help honestly wondering what planet these people were from. Their loyalty and hard work is wonderful but that they couldn't even conceive of the idea that maybe they too are as much at fault as the evil liberals was a bit disturbing. After all, if everyone was a traditionalist, and traditionalism was so wonderful, where on earth did the liberals come from? Mars?

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  6. Honestly, I have never been able to understand the EF vs. NO debate. The Church says both are valid, therefore both are valid. At any given time I will go to either, depending on which is available and which I feel suits my needs at the moment, but never for a second does that make one right and the other wrong. When we go to Mass, any Mass, no matter how poorly or arrogantly celebrated, we go as students who need to learn and starving people who need to be fed. It's like going to a soup kitchen and complaining about the color of the plates.

    I like Pope Francis' way of doing things. As another commenter said, there is a place for taking into consideration the way the world will twist your words. On the other hand, there is also wisdom in realizing that the world will always twist your words, and you cannot predict how and you cannot prevent it. May as well just speak the truth, do what you think is right, and let the chips fall where they may. I trust that whatever he does he does out of love, and either way, the Church will prevail.

    A little trust in God, maybe?

    Good post.

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